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Compulsive Gambling

Overview

Also called: Gambling Addiction

Many people enjoy gambling, whether it's betting on a horse or playing poker on the Internet. Most people who gamble don't have a problem, but some lose control of their gambling. Signs of problem gambling include

  1. Always thinking about gambling
  2. Lying about gambling
  3. Spending work or family time gambling
  4. Feeling bad after you gamble, but not quitting
  5. Gambling with money you need for other things

Many people can control their compulsive gambling with medicines and therapy. Support groups can also help.

Resources
Gambling: When Is It a Problem? (American Academy of Family Physicians)

Compulsive Gambling (Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research)

Frequently Asked Questions about Gambling and Problem Gambling (National Council on Problem Gambling)

When Gambling Becomes a Bad Bet (American Medical Association)